Focal Points – Small Changes can Focus Attention or Diffuse It.

Focal Points – Small Changes can Focus Attention or Diffuse It.

Black Faux Granite Sink
Black Faux Granite Sink
Even small choices can make an impact in achieving your design goal. Let’s look at this kitchenette that’s part of a basement media room. The sink we chose is a solid surface material made primarily from black granite (Blanco 515-539).  It blends seamlessly into the ubatuba granite countertop except that it has little sheen.  The room painted in a dark charcoal, floored in slate, and furnished with dark upholstery is meant to absorb light and to create an almost womb-like feeling of enclosure and protection.  The reflective stone backsplash, stainless steel faucet, and yellow entry wall create a counterpoint to the deep matte colors in the rest of the room.  The sink is meant to become part of the absorptive background — it’s not meant to attract attention.

Same Kitchentte w/ Stainless Stink
Same Kitchentte w/ Stainless Stink
In the photo, above, I altered the image to depict a stainless steel sink.  The reflective surface of the stainless sink would have broadened the focal point.  Instead of the focus being tightly on the faucet, the focal point becomes more blurred and therefore less effective.  Admittedly, the difference is subtle — perhaps a little more apparent in person than in a photo.  However, keeping a tight visual focal point can make the difference between a good design and one that fully meets it’s objectives and gets rave reviews.
All images courtesy of Braitman Design/Build


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